Tomorrow begins the European qualifying campaign for the 2022 FIFA World Cup in Qatar. At the same time, a report recently published in The Guardian revealed that thousands of migrant workers have died in Qatar over the course of preparations for the tournament. In this blog post, Ruben Timmerman discusses this report in light of the wider context of corruption within the sport, and reflects on the nature and trajectory of professional world football going forward.
The heist of the century. Thinking of a diamond or bank robbery? Art theft? Something à la Money Heist, Ocean’s Eleven or The Killing? Its less glamorous but more harmful than that: the Cum-Ex Files. In this blog post, Anna Merz shortly discusses how the intermingling of state and corporate actors—law enforcement authorities, politicians and financial institutions—has contributed to the (so far) rather lenient response to the scandal, and the preservation of the status quo.
Today’s guest writer for the Rotterdam Criminology Blog is Mathijs Giltjes, a PhD Candidate from Erasmus School of Law who researches high frequency trading and market abuse. In this blog post, Mathijs offers a critical reflection on the value and limitations of the EU financial criminal law framework in combating high-frequency trading. This blog post carries important criminological relevance in relation to technology and cybercrime, and the unique challenges of developing effective criminal justice system responses to crimes of the powerful.
A few weeks ago, US President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order on preventing online censorship, which could significantly affect how social media platforms govern the content of their users. In this blog post, Amr Marzouk draws on the latest Trump-Twitter feud to explore challenges surrounding online censorship, 'fake news', and the growing influence of Big Tech. It argues that Trump’s recent Executive Order serves to worsen, rather than address, these important challenges.
This blog post reports on the events of the #BlackLivesMatter demonstration in Rotterdam in light of global protests surrounding the police killing of George Floyd. It also discusses the tension between the protests and the ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis. Finally, it offers some critical reflection on the need to confront the challenges of police violence and systemic racism in the Netherlands and in our own city.
As COVID-19 spreads through prisons, governments are focusing on public safety rather than the health and human rights of people in prison – and it is resulting in irresponsible and unfair policies.