Today’s guest writer for the Rotterdam Criminology Blog is Mathijs Giltjes, a PhD Candidate from Erasmus School of Law who researches high frequency trading and market abuse. In this blog post, Mathijs offers a critical reflection on the value and limitations of the EU financial criminal law framework in combating high-frequency trading. This blog post carries important criminological relevance in relation to technology and cybercrime, and the unique challenges of developing effective criminal justice system responses to crimes of the powerful.
This blog post reports on the events of the #BlackLivesMatter demonstration in Rotterdam in light of global protests surrounding the police killing of George Floyd. It also discusses the tension between the protests and the ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis. Finally, it offers some critical reflection on the need to confront the challenges of police violence and systemic racism in the Netherlands and in our own city.
As COVID-19 spreads through prisons, governments are focusing on public safety rather than the health and human rights of people in prison – and it is resulting in irresponsible and unfair policies.
On Thursday March 5, 2020 dr. Lisa van Reemst defended her PhD thesis titled: Emergency Responders at Risk. This research involved an empirical analysis of the relationship between emergency responders’ […]
Door middel van risicotaxatie wordt ingeschat of mensen die in aanraking komen met justitie opnieuw delicten zullen plegen. In de Engelse gevangeniskrant Inside Time schrijven gedetineerden over fouten en fundamentele bezwaren. Hun klachten roepen de vraag op: hoe rechtvaardig is het om mensen te onderwerpen risicotaxatie?
Research on fear of crime, perceived disorder and victimization still rely heavily on verbal (textual) questions in surveys and interviews. However, a recent overview of research in which visual methods are employed shows that exceptions do exist.