Today’s guest writer for the Rotterdam Criminology Blog is Mathijs Giltjes, a PhD Candidate from Erasmus School of Law who researches high frequency trading and market abuse. In this blog post, Mathijs offers a critical reflection on the value and limitations of the EU financial criminal law framework in combating high-frequency trading. This blog post carries important criminological relevance in relation to technology and cybercrime, and the unique challenges of developing effective criminal justice system responses to crimes of the powerful.
A few weeks ago, US President Donald Trump issued an Executive Order on preventing online censorship, which could significantly affect how social media platforms govern the content of their users. In this blog post, Amr Marzouk draws on the latest Trump-Twitter feud to explore challenges surrounding online censorship, 'fake news', and the growing influence of Big Tech. It argues that Trump’s recent Executive Order serves to worsen, rather than address, these important challenges.
This blog post reports on the events of the #BlackLivesMatter demonstration in Rotterdam in light of global protests surrounding the police killing of George Floyd. It also discusses the tension between the protests and the ongoing COVID-19 public health crisis. Finally, it offers some critical reflection on the need to confront the challenges of police violence and systemic racism in the Netherlands and in our own city.
As COVID-19 spreads through prisons, governments are focusing on public safety rather than the health and human rights of people in prison – and it is resulting in irresponsible and unfair policies.
On Thursday May 7, 2020 dr. Teun van Ruitenburg defended his PhD thesis digitally. His thesis, titled Raising Moral Barriers. An empirical study on the Dutch approach of outlaw motorcycle gangs, provides insights in the question how the Dutch government’s approach to biker gangs has developed from the 1970s to the present. We recently interviewed him to inquire about the focus and results of his PhD studies.
“Keeping it real” is considered to be one of rap’s mantras and reflects the musical genre’s longstanding and complex relation with authenticity. The authenticity of rap artists – or “realness”, to put it into rap and street vernacular – tends to hinge on whether rappers (still) have a connection to the streets. In this blog post, Robby Roks reflects on the recent controversy surrounding Brooklyn rapper Tekashi 6ix9ine to explore the performativity of street credibility, and the intertwinement of rap music, the streets, gangs, violence, and law enforcement agencies.